Eastern Meadowlark to Canada Warbler

Last Sunday found us meandering along Guelph Line to the Aberfoyle Antique Market in Guelph. We haven’t the foggiest idea why we didn’t exit at Highway 401, as planned. But for this mistake we would never have seen this Eastern Meadowlark!

Eastern Meadowlark

Eastern Meadowlark

Earlier that morning I waltzed into Lasalle Marina.  I leaned against a light post in the parking lot to photograph this trio of Barn Swallows.

Jockeying for position

Jockeying for position

Adult Barn Swallow with fledglings

Adult Barn Swallow with fledglings

Over here!

Over here!

Barn Swallow fledgling fed by parent

Barn Swallow fledgling fed by parent

As the marina was populated with holidayers, this adult Black-crowned Night-Heron found himself a suitable hiding spot.

Adult Black-crowned Night-Heron

Adult Black-crowned Night-Heron

This singing Carolina Wren would not be ignored.

Carolina Wren (singing)

Carolina Wren (singing)

August 16th and 17th at Hendrie

Recently I suspected there was a second Carolina Wren at Hendrie. Well, summer loving brought forth wee ones. I suspect there are at least three fledglings. This is encouraging news as their numbers are down.

Fledgling Carolina Wren

Fledgling Carolina Wren

Carolina wren (fledgling)

Carolina wren (fledgling)

Carolina Wren (fledgling)

Carolina Wren (fledgling)

Cedar Waxwings have also been busy. The three nestlings have since fledged.

Cedar Waxwing (fledgling)

Cedar Waxwing (fledgling)

The pair of Common Yellowthroats were observed briefly.  I did get some great looks at this juvenile American Redstart.

American Redstart (juvenile male)

American Redstart (juvenile male)

Another look at the juvenile American Redstart

Another look at the juvenile American Redstart

A Green Heron was a surprise visitor to the boardwalk. The bird quickly dispatched all who dared to make him feel unwelcome.

Green Heron and Blue Jay

Green Heron and Blue Jay

Green Herons pop up where you least expect them.

Adult Green Heron

Adult Green Heron

Juvenile Green Heron yawning

Juvenile Green Heron yawning

Thrilled to bits to see a female Ruby-throated Hummingbird.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (female)

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (female)

Blue Jays, members of the ad hoc welcoming committee, include these two bald jays.  There are a number of reasons for this including molt, lice, or nutritional factors.

Bald Blue Jays

Bald Blue Jays

Gray Catbirds are calling from every quarter. Chickadees, Nuthatches, and Downies vie for your attention and seeds. Sometimes a bird unexpectedly lands in front of you, as was the case with this Least Flycatcher. The white eye ring and yellow abdomen helped us distinguish it from similar looking flycatchers.

Least Flycatcher

Least Flycatcher

At other times there is movement but no sound, as was the case with this Great-crested Flycatcher.

Great-crested Flycatcher

Great-crested Flycatcher

This is one of two Great Blue Herons heading east.

Great Blue Heron in flight

Great Blue Heron in flight

Spent some time with lads at Grindstone.  On Saturday the topic of discussion was news of the poor outlook for this year’s shorebird numbers.  On the Sunday (with a different group), we discussed the raptors, deer and the late Queen Mother!  Story is she died leaving a substantial debt.  This was due to her love of horse racing. Nearby Osprey, Spotted Sandpipers, Caspian Terns, Black-crowned and Great Blue herons and Belted Kingfishers were either resting, foraging or observed in flight.  Turkey Vultures were missing in action when I was there.

Osprey departs with goldfish

Osprey departs with goldfish

Osprey (hunting)

Osprey (hunting)

Spotted Sandpiper in flight

Spotted Sandpiper in flight

Belted Kingfisher (female)

Belted Kingfisher (female)

Belted Kingfishers (female and male)

Belted Kingfishers (female and male)

And last but certainly not least, although a bit challenging to photograph, I managed to capture a Canada Warbler.

Profile of a Canada Warbler

Profile of a Canada Warbler

Canada Warbler

Canada Warbler

Canada Warbler at Hendrie Valley

Canada Warbler at Hendrie Valley

While I’m missing Colonel Samuel Smith Park in Etobicoke, I’m thoroughly enjoying birding locally. I’m learning (a) favoured trees and locations, (b) to keep an ear out for fledglings, (c) territorial and nesting behaviour, (d) to stop, wait, look, listen and (3) to expect the unexpected.

 

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