Wee Watch 2016

Following up on last week’s post, a Piping Plover chick hatched at Darlington Provincial Park on Thursday, June 16th, the first to be born on the Canadian shore of Lake Simcoe since 1934! What wonderful news!

Here are a variety of youngsters encountered recently at local haunts, including today, June 19th.

Wood Duck duckling

Wood Duck duckling

Ring-billed Gull chick

Ring-billed Gull chick

Ring-billed Gull chick trying to get some rest

Ring-billed Gull chick trying to get some rest

Mute Swan cygnets resting in the shade

Mute Swan cygnets resting in the shade

Exasperated male Cardinal seeking a handout to assist with raising Juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird

Exasperated male Cardinal seeks assistance while raising a juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird. Unfortunately, I had not brought any oiled sunflower seeds to the park.

Female Northern Cardinal foraging and being shadowed by the juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird she is raising

Female Northern Cardinal foraging and being shadowed by the juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird she is raising with her mate.

A close-up of the juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird being raised by a pair of Northern Cardinals

A close-up of the hungry brute aka juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird being raised by a pair of Northern Cardinals

Adult and juvenile Blue Jays

Adult and juvenile Blue Jays

Juvenile European Starling foraging alone along the path

Juvenile European Starling foraging alone along the path

Young and inexperienced European Starling

Young European Starling alone with no one to look to for guidance

Young Blanding's Turtle (endangered)

Young Blanding’s Turtle (threatened) at Hendrie Valley Park. “Threatened” means the species lives in the wild in Ontario, is not endangered, but is likely to become endangered if steps are not taken to address factors threatening it. The most significant threats to the Blanding’s Turtle are loss or fragmenting of habitat, motor vehicles, and raccoons and foxes that prey on eggs. Illegal collection for the pet trade is also a serious threat. Blanding’s Turtles are slow breeders – they don’t start to lay eggs until they are in their teens or twenties – so adult deaths of breeding age adults can have major impacts on the species. [Source: Ontario.ca]

Juvenile Canada Goose

Juvenile Canada Goose. The family was inseparable. Am happy the parents have abandoned their hissing.

Barn Swallow and nestling

Barn Swallow and nestling.

Caspian Tern and Ring-billed Gulls with their young

Caspian Tern and Ring-billed Gulls with their young

Caspian Tern family at the water's edge. The youngster was taking a bath.

Caspian Tern family at the water’s edge. The youngster was taking a bath.

Adult and juvenile Caspian Terns

Adult and juvenile Caspian Terns

Female mallard and her duckling

Female mallard and her duckling

Mallard ducklings

Mallard ducklings

A trio of Mallard ducklings

A trio of Mallard ducklings

Remember this Red-necked Grebe’s nest at Bronte Harbour?

Nesting Red-necked Grebe No. 2 standing allowing for view of eggs

Nesting Red-necked Grebe No. 2 standing allowing for view of eggs

This nest in the Outer Harbour Marina lost all of its eggs, possibly because of the birds piling on too much material. Per G. Edmonstone.

This is what we encountered June 18th. I’ve now read “possibly because of the birds piling on too much material”, per G. Edmonstone.

Only one of the two Killdeer chicks have survived

Only one of the two Killdeer chicks have survived

On a happier note, these are today from the beach strip.  This is the from the first of three nests.

Female Baltimore Oriole feeding her nestlings

Female Baltimore Oriole feeding her nestlings

Male Baltimore oriole feeds his nestlings

Male Baltimore oriole feeds his nestlings

The chicks in nest No. 2 remain hidden. These photographs are of nest No. 3.

Baltimore Oriole chick fledged on either June 18 or 19, 2016

Baltimore Oriole chick fledged on either June 18 or 19, 2016

Baltimore Oriole fledgling stretches wings

Baltimore Oriole fledgling stretches wings

Female Baltimore Oriole and her hungry fledgling

Female Baltimore Oriole and her hungry fledgling

Baltimore Oriole fledgling mouth agape begging for food

Baltimore Oriole fledgling, mouth agape, begging for food

Male Baltimore Oriole attending to nestling while fledgling sits on branch above

Male Baltimore Oriole attending to nestling while fledgling sits on branch above

Fledgling Baltimore Oriole asking to be fed

Fledgling Baltimore Oriole asking to be fed

 

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