Heron observation + a Brant + Hanlan’s Point trip

Valley Inn, Hamilton

Am having a marvy time photographing juvenile Black-crowned Night Herons.

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron having a bit of an scratch

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron having a bit of an scratch

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron waiting in the shadows

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron waiting in the shadows

Two of us observed and photographed this juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron as it foraged in the rain.  We believed we were recording tool-baiting behaviour. “Herons place bait, either natural or artificial, in the water to lure prey. The behavior is called Baiting. They can use real food, such as bread, maize, or dead insect, or choose as a lure something that floats, such as stick. Fish are attracted to the lure, coming within striking range of the baiting bird.” (See here)

Black-crowned Night Heron checking if bait attracted prey

Black-crowned Night Heron checking if bait attracted prey

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron retrieving the bit of wood

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron retrieving the bit of wood

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron rethinking strategy

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron rethinking strategy

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Heron

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron retrieving the bit of wood from water

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron retrieving the bit of wood from water

Black-crowned Night-Heron with stick

Black-crowned Night-Heron with stick

This went on for a few more minutes. Afterwards the heron waded over to where we were standing then hopped onto the edge of the pier, mere feet from us.

Landing less than 20 feet from us

Landing less than 20 feet from us

We weren’t quite sure how to interpret this look!

Looking for parental guidance perhaps?

Looking for parental guidance perhaps?

Recently, this beaver tarried for about ten minutes to consume lunch.  What a thrill!

Beaver consuming lunch

Beaver consuming lunch

Cute beaver

Cute beaver

The Lesser Yellowlegs are quite entertaining. When not foraging they are fighting.

Lesser Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs stand-off

Lesser Yellowlegs stand-off

See how well the Green Heron camouflages with its surroundings.

Nicely camouflaged Green Heron

Nicely camouflaged Green Heron

This is one of five Northern Shovelers observed last Friday.

Northern Shoveler

Northern Shoveler

Gotta love this Great Blue Heron.

Mirror, mirror on the wall who's the fairest of them all? (Great Blue Heron)

Mirror, mirror on the wall who’s the fairest of them all? (Great Blue Heron)

I took a brief walk through yesterday noting a seed notice posted at the Cherry Hill Gate entrance.

Seed notice at Cherry Hill Gate entrance

Seed notice at Cherry Hill Gate entrance

Interesting. I still think they need to state clearly that only nyger or black-oiled sunflower seeds should be offered.  In the past week or so I’ve removed beer nuts, flavoured peanuts, and pumpkin seeds left as offerings to the birds by visitors.

Bayshore Park, Hamilton

A Brant arrived at Bayshore Park in Hamilton on September 22, where it remains to date (September 28th).  I made a beeline to the park after work. The Brant had an unbridled appetite.  I had to wait eons for the bird to look up.  It felt like eons because I was also contending with flies (horseflies?) feasting on my legs.

Brant at Bayfront Park, Hamilton

Brant at Bayfront Park, Hamilton

Brant strolling in the evening

Brant strolling in the evening

Brant preening

Brant preening

Brant (in profile)

Brant (in profile)

Heading back to the parking lot I stopped to photograph this juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron foraging in the water beneath a large weeping willow.

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron

Whilst doing so I heard, “Is the Brant still here?”  Lo, it was the voice of B. Coombs.  After greetings and confirming directions, I let it slip that I was thinking of joining the Toronto Ornithological Club’s outing he was leading at the Toronto Islands on Saturday, September 24th.  And so I did avec mon Sherpa.  Loads of birds.  Seventy-one species were observed during the walk from Hanlan’s Point to Centre Island.  The Blue Jay count was estimated 500! ‘Twas a never-ending stream of jays. There were fourteen species of warblers.  We observed Dark-eyed Juncos, White-crowned and White-throated Sparrows, and two Common Ravens soaring over the city as we stood on the ferry dock. Here are a few photographs:

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Black-throated Blue Warbler

Northern Harrier (juvenile)

Northern Harrier (juvenile)

Field Sparrow

Field Sparrow

female Rusty Blackbird

female Rusty Blackbird

Black-throated Green Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

I left prior to the last leg of the trip and missed out on an American Bittern.  This was after missing  a photo op of a Grey-cheeked Thrush due to a poorly timed washroom break.  As the song goes, “If it weren’t for bad luck I’d have no luck at all”. Lol!

Back on shore, we had a lovely lunch at Stoney’s Bread Company in Oakville.  The soup is to die for!

Last week at Lasalle Marina, Common Mergansers, a Great Blue Heron, a Belted Kingfisher and this Pied-billed Grebe were observed.

Pied-bill grebe

Pied-billed grebe

Am still having loads of fun and good eats!

 

Happy Valley!

On cooler days I’ve walked from Beach Road and Eastport Drive to Spencer Smith Park. On one such walk the cries of juvenile raptors caught my attention. I was curious as the Lift Bridge’s Peregrine Falcons did not have young this year. I soon found a trio of American Kestrels. The sun was harsh. Fortunately, this kestrel found a perch on the underside of the Burlington Skyway Bridge.

american-kestrel-perched-under-burlington-skyway-bridge-begging-for-food

American Kestrel perched under Burlington Skyway Bridge begging to be fed

Along the route to Spencer Smith Park, I heard/saw Warbling Vireos, Baltimore Orioles, Northern Mockingbirds, two Great Black-Backed Gulls, etc.

great-black-backed-gull-tugging-avian-carcass-on-the-beach

Great Black-backed Gull tugging carcass on the beach

This Semipalmated Plover has pluck. I have visited the bird about three or four times. Each time the bird has successfully managed to dodge the throng on the beach.

semipalmated-plover-finds-a-spot-to-forage-among-the-throng-of-beachgoers

Semipalmated Plover finds a spot to forage among the throng of beachgoers

semipalmated-plover-on-the-beach

Semipalmated Plover on the beach

semipalmated-plover-resting-on-the-beach

Semipalmated Plover resting on the beach

semipalmated-plover-resting-on-the-beach-2

Semipalmated Plover keeping an eye out for predators

Been having loads of fun lately hanging out at Hendrie Valley and Valley Inn. I’ve enjoyed spending some time with the group I nicknamed the Boys of Summer as I only see most of them in the summer.  We’ve had many good laughs. I shall miss them when they move on.

These last two-three weeks photographers from as far as Ajax and the Niagara area have migrated to the area to photograph the Osprey.

photographing-osprey-at-valley-inn

Photographing Osprey at Valley Inn

osprey-on-the-hunt

Osprey on the hunt

Some days the Osprey spend much of their time roosting in nearby trees.

osprey-resting-on-a-branch

Osprey resting on a branch

osprey-in-profile

Osprey

Fortunately, rather cooperative Great Egrets, Green Herons, juvenile Black-crowned Night-Herons and Great Blue Herons are nearby.

green-heron-on-the-hunt

Green Heron on the hunt

Sometimes I telepathically ask a bird to do something other than standing still.  Sometimes it works!

green-heron-contorts-body-during-preening

Green Heron contorts body mid-preening

green-heron-yawning

Yawning

green-heron-stretching-wing

Wing stretch

green-heron-stretching-after-preening-voyeuristic-midland-painted-turtle-in-the-background

Green Heron stretching while Midland Painted Turtle observes all

green-heron-hunting

Green Heron hunting

wild-looking-juvenile-black-crowned-night-heron

“Wild looking” juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron

black-crowned-night-heron-juvenile

Black-crowned Night-heron (juvenile)

black-crowned-night-heron-juvenile-seeking-sustenance

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron looking for something to eat

juvenile-black-crowned-night-heron-standing-on-one-leg

Juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron standing on one leg

stoop-to-poop

Stoop to poop

great-blue-heron-scratching-an-itch

Great Blue Heron scratching an itch

great-blue-heron-and-raccoon-in-the-fog

Great Blue Heron and raccoon in the fog

So, do you remember the #Melanistic Great Blue Heron?  Well, after the rains and much pruning, guess who is now confirmed to be oiled?

youd-look-crazed-too-if-youd-spent-weeks-preening-your-feathers

You’d look crazed too if you’d spent weeks preening your feathers!

More recently a small number of quite confiding Lesser Yellowlegs have posed for the photographers.

lesser-yellowlegs

Lesser Yellowlegs

lesser-yellowlegs-3

Lesser Yellowlegs

lesser-yellowlegs-2

Lesser Yellowlegs

I often stray to see what I what other birds are around.

black-throated-green-warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

northern-flicker-a-preening

Northern Flicker a-preening

common-yellowthroat-male

Common Yellowthroat

turkey-vulture-warming-in-the-sun

Turkey Vulture warming in the sun

While we still miss our beloved guinea pig, Caramel, for a bit of fun and to help raise the profile of guinea pigs, we attended a pignic last Saturday at Greenwood Park, Toronto.  The guinea pigs were beyond adorable!

guinea-pig-pignic-announcement

guinea-pig-on-the-red-carpet

Guinea pig posing on the red carpet

guinea-pig-check-up

Virginia Rail and Sora

The following birds were photographed at Hendrie Valley:

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Red-eyed Vireo

Red-eyed Vireo

Juvenile Blue Jay

Juvenile Blue Jay

Juvenile Wood Duck

Juvenile Wood Duck

Green Heron on the hunt

Green Heron on the hunt

Green Heron stretching wing

Green Heron stretching wing

Belted Kingfisher

female Belted Kingfisher

Last Saturday we pulled over on Eastport Drive. A gent was busy photographing the cormorants when we arrived. Such was his displeasure that he stopped taking photographs and set his face to the most miserable look he could find. A bona fide humbug.  We ignored him as we did not disturb the family of cormorants he was photographing nor did we block his view of them. We took our photographs and left.

Partial view of Double-crested Cormorant colony on Eastport Drive

Partial view of cormorant and gull colony on Eastport Drive

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

Black-crowned Night-Heron

Black-crowned Night-Heron

Black-crowned Night-Heron on a nest

Black-crowned Night-Heron on a nest

Windermere Basin was our next stop. Here a Green Heron was sunning on a log.

Green Heron sunning on a log

Green Heron sunning on a log

The following day we headed to Kerncliff Park to try for Virginia Rail and Sora. Both species breed here. They vocalize loudly but run about silently.  You always have to be at the ready as you never quite know where they will appear.  A second pair of eyes on the marsh was most helpful.  This Virginia Rail gave us gripping views.

Virginia Rail walking in marsh

Virginia Rail walking in marsh

Virginia Rail in marsh

Virginia Rail in marsh

Virginia Rail enjoying the warmth of the sun

Virginia Rail enjoying the warmth of the sun

Virginia Rail stretching wing after preening

Virginia Rail stretching wing after preening

Virginia Rail

Virginia Rail

In due course, I photographed lifer no. 213, the Sora.

Sora

Sora

We hit the trail for City View. Along the route we saw Northern Flickers, a female Red-breasted Grosbeak, Eastern Towhee, swallows and a singing House Wren.

House Wren singing

House Wren singing

Yesterday we headed to Fort Erie to photograph Purple Martins. There seemed to be fewer martins this year.

Purple Martin house

Purple Martin house

Purple Martin nestling longing for parent's arrival

Purple Martin nestling longing for parent’s arrival

Purple Martin nestling waiting to be fed

Purple Martin nestling waiting to be fed

male Purple Martin

male Purple Martin

Purple Martin with insect

female Purple Martin with insect

After this we headed to Mud Lake Conservation Area in Welland. We tried birding at this spot about two years ago but turned back because (1) the trail was swarming with mosquitoes, and (2) a visitor found ticks on his person. This visit, maybe one or two mosquitoes. Great Egrets were the target. We found four.

Four Great Egrets

Four Great Egrets

Great Egret with fish

Great Egret with fish

As shorebirds were well out of camera range we focused on frogs.

Frog

Frog

Another green frog

Another green frog

I see you

I see you

There were four Osprey at Hendrie this morning. As none were hunting, I spent time acquainting myself with Turkey Vultures. At least 20 Turkey Vultures were variously soaring, roosting, preening, ambulating, and resting.

Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture preening

Turkey Vulture preening

14 Turkey Vultures

14 Turkey Vultures

They had no qualms sharing their favourite tree with a rather vocal Osprey.

Osprey (but for the branch...)

Osprey (but for the branch…)

In this heat, birding early in the morning for short periods, preferably close to water, is the best strategy.

A little of this and a little of that

I headed to Col. Sam after finally accepting the Bronte Harbour grebes may not successfully breed this year. There were four Grebe families at Col. Sam’s marina. This family had the youngest chicks.

Red-necked Grebe chicks resting with parent

Red-necked Grebe chicks resting with parent

It certainly was an interesting morning. This Great Blue Heron was hunting just beyond the break wall along the pedestrian path. I sat still so as not to flush the bird. The heron had rather odd way of hunting, vis, running into the water in pursuit of fish. I eventually got a clear photograph but this shot was more interesting to me.

This Great Blue Heron ran into the water, missed the fish then returned to shore to resume the hunt for sustenance.

This Great Blue Heron ran into the water, missed the fish then returned to shore to resume the hunt for sustenance.

While following a Song Sparrow feeding a juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird, I heard juvenile Yellow Warblers calling for their parents in a nearby tree.

Yellow Warbler fledgling waiting to be fed

Yellow Warbler fledgling waiting to be fed

I chaperoned this Snapping Turtle, alerting cyclists, joggers, pedestrians, as it crossed the path.

I turtlesat this Snapping Turtle as it crossed the busy pedestrian and cycling path.

Snapping Turtle

Snapping Turtle marching towards pond on opposite side of pedestrian and cyclist path.

Snapping Turtle marching towards pond on opposite side of pedestrian and cyclist path.

These young rabbits were romping, running through the covered picnic bench area, down the path, over to the woodlot and back. Ah, the joys of youth.

Two juvenile rabbits romping at Colonel Samuel Smith Park.

Two juvenile rabbits romping at Colonel Samuel Smith Park.

The flicker nest cavity I found back in April or May (can’t remember) is now home to two youngsters.   I hung out for a bit waiting for the adult to return but I got hungry and left.

The tree cavity I found in April or May is now home to two juvenile Northern Flickers.

The tree cavity I found in April or May is now home to two juvenile Northern Flickers.

If you wish to get up close and personal with Wood Ducks, the Grenadier Pond at High Park is the place to be. There were multiple families along the stretch. If you stop anywhere along the length of the pond the ducklings and at times the adults climb the embankment seeking handouts.

female Wood Duck

female Wood Duck

Juvenile Wood Duck at High Park

Juvenile Wood Duck at High Park

Juvenile male Wood Duck having a bit of a rest

Juvenile male Wood Duck having a bit of a rest

This Black-crowned Night-Heron, on the other hand, had no interest in supplementing his diet.

Black-crowned Night Heron hunting

Black-crowned Night-Heron hunting

After lunching at the Grenadier Restaurant, we walked through the zoo, primarily to eyeball the recaptured capybaras. From time to time they would stand by the fence, likely missing their short-lived freedom.

The two famous Capybaras at High Park

The two famous Capybaras at High Park

As we admired the reindeer, a loud booming voice behind us commanded, “Hey, Tundra, come over. These people want to take a picture of you”.   ‘Twas the voice of a chuckling volunteer, who answered all our questions and allowed us to feed Tundra a carrot.

Tundra - a male reindeer at High Park

Tundra – a male reindeer at High Park

Unbearable heat and humidity have caused me to abruptly abandon trips at Hendrie Valley. Fortunately, the mosquito population is non-existent although I heard a chap complaining about the horse flies. Now that I think of it, the same guy complained about the worms and caterpillars hanging from the trees weeks earlier.

Searching for Green Herons I chanced upon a relatively accessible Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers’ nest.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher brings an insect to feed two hungry nestlings

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher brings an insect to feed two hungry nestlings

Close-up photograph of the nestlings taken on June 30, 2016.

Close-up photograph of the nestlings taken on June 30, 2016.

Days later I re-attended to check on the chicks. A fellow photographer I met on the boardwalk was keen to join in on the action. As we photographed the nest, this nestling, driven by hunger, fledged from the nest for a few minutes! What a treat.

Hungry Blue-gray Gnatcatcher nestling

Hungry Blue-gray Gnatcatcher nestling

One of the nestlings popped out of the nest briefly on July 3, 2016.

One of the nestlings popped out of the nest briefly on July 3, 2016.

Rechecking days later, as expected the family had moved on. There are several Gnatcatcher nests in the park. Keep an ear out and you may find singles or a family foraging together.

Juvenile Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Juvenile Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

A photographer and I had opportunity to photograph this Great Blue Heron.

Great Blue Heron climbing a tree trunk

Great Blue Heron climbing a tree trunk

Great Blue Heron in flight.

Great Blue Heron in flight.

Suddenly, just west of the heron, there was the sound of fussing Red-winged Blackbirds. The cause of their protestation – a female Red-Tailed Hawk. The birds chased the hawk to the opposite side of the stream. Soon they were joined by American Crows. What a commotion! Together they mobbed the hawk away from their territory.

American Crows and Red-winged Blackbirds mobbing Red-tailed Hawk at Hendrie Valley.

American Crows and Red-winged Blackbirds mobbing Red-tailed Hawk at Hendrie Valley.

This summer I’ve witnessed Red-winged Blackbirds chasing a pair of Belted Kingfishers. This male was able rest for a while, free of harassment, although a male Red-winged Blackbird did make an appearance but didn’t bother to rally the troops.

Belted Kingfisher

Belted Kingfisher

Here is a photograph of Eastern Kingbirds chasing an Osprey from their territory.

Eastern Kingbirds chasing Osprey from their territory

Eastern Kingbirds chasing Osprey from their territory

These birds were also spotted at the park:

This gorgeous male Indigo Bunting was photographed at Hendrie Valley. The female was rather skittish.

This gorgeous male Indigo Bunting was photographed at Hendrie Valley. The female was rather skittish.

The juvenile Red-bellied Woodpecker was foraging on his own.

The juvenile Red-bellied Woodpecker was foraging on his own.

Somebody has bad breath (juvenile and adult Common Grackles at Hendrie Valley Park

Somebody has bad breath (juvenile and adult Common Grackles)

Here a female Baltimore Oriole feeds her young berries plucked from a nearby tree.

Here a female Baltimore Oriole feeds her young berries plucked from a nearby tree.

Time spent at the Lift Bridge Canal and downtown Burlington have also been productive.

The parents of this recently fledged Barn Swallow enjoy the comforts this Jeep affords.

The parents of this recently fledged Barn Swallow enjoy the comforts this Jeep affords.

Male House Sparrow and his young

Male House Sparrow and his young at a parking lot

A female Mallard and her three sleeping ducklings - Lift Bridge, Burlington

A female Mallard and her three sleeping ducklings – Lift Bridge, Burlington

I’m falling for the Common Terns.  They hunt for fish at the tip of the pier at the Lift Bridge Canal, completely oblivious to the presence of humans.

Common Tern searching water for prey

Common Tern searching water for prey

Common Tern hovering over potential prey

Common Tern hovering over potential prey

Don’t let the weather deter you too much.  There’s still lots around. If the birding is slow as it often does at the height of the day, some photographers switch to insects, (butterflies, moths, dragonflies), flowers, etc.  I’m enjoying the ships at the Lift Bridge and the trains at Hendrie.

 

 

 

Birding and Train Spotting

During the week I made two trips to the beach strip in Burlington to check on the Baltimore Orioles.  All three nests are empty.  The fledglings are thriving.

Baltimore Oriole feeding its young

Baltimore Oriole feeding its young

During the last walkabout the begging cries of Warbling Vireo nestlings and fledglings led to the discovery of two nests and this fledgling.

Juvenile Warbling Vireo

Juvenile Warbling Vireo

There are quite a number of juveniles along the stretch including Red-winged Blackbirds, European Starlings, Common Grackles, American Robins and all the other usual suspects.

Juvenile European Starling feeding on berries

Juvenile European Starling feeding on berries

Still working on capturing Chimney Swifts in flight.

Chimney Swifts in flight

Chimney Swifts in flight

The plight of this Rough-winged Swallow was reported to me by beachgoers.  Unfortunately, it was injured and unable to fly.

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Saturday, June 25th was the laziest birding outing I’ve ever had at Hendrie Valley.  I pretty much spent most of it socializing.   Loads of fun!  At the entrance of Cherry Hill Gate there were Downy Woodpeckers (adult and juvenile), a Hairy Woodpecker as well as this juvenile Red-bellied Woodpecker.

Red-bellied Woodpecker (juvenile)

Red-bellied Woodpecker (juvenile)

Down the hill and along the boardwalk, Red-winged Blackbirds were observed harassing a pair of Belted Kingfishers.  Onward to the area known as Valley Inn.  I hung out with the raptor photographers chatting about everything from Brexit to soccer as we awaited the arrival of Osprey.  In the interim we photographed visitors to the nearby mulberry bush.

Juvenile American Robin in mulberry bush

Juvenile American Robin in mulberry bush

Red squirrel enjoying berries of mulberry bush

Red squirrel enjoying berries of mulberry bush

A family of geese appeared.

a pair of juvenile Canada Goose out for a stroll

a pair of juvenile Canada Goose out for a stroll

Finally, an Osprey appeared.

Osprey on the hunt

Osprey on the hunt

Later I joined the train spotters at the bridge near Laking Gardens.  Among the group were two visiting American train spotters/photographers.  I learned quite a bit about trains in the hour plus I spent with the group and tried my hand at a few photographs.  I left with the thought – there’s something for everybody at Hendrie.

Reflection

Reflection

GO Train heading to Appleby GO station

GO Train heading to Appleby GO station

Double stacked railway cars

Double stacked railway cars

Please do visit glc392, a member of this great group of guys, to view spectacular photographs of trains.

My little buddy, Rastro, an Australian Shepherd, joined us for the afternoon.  As Rastro has a touch of arthritis we ensured we only visited locations requiring minimal walking.  He helped us find this snake.

Eyed by a watersnake

Eyed by a watersnake

These snakes were photographed last weekend.

Northern Watersnake

Northern Watersnake

Garter snake sunning along the path

Garter snake sunning along the path

Our first stop was Kerncliff Park, in Burlington, to try for Virginia Rails.  No luck but we did observe House Wrens, Brown Thrashers and quite a few Painted Turtles.

Tiny Painted Turtles appearing to kiss

Tiny Painted Turtles appearing to kiss

Next was Eastport Drive.

Ring-billed Gull chicks harassing adult for food

Ring-billed Gull chicks harassing adult for food

Adult Ring-billed Gull regurgitates food for its young

Adult Ring-billed Gull regurgitates food for its young

I almost puked. Consequently, the balance of the photos of this quartet were out of focus.

Next up was the Great Lakes and Rebecca storm water ponds in Oakville.  Last week we observed a female Hooded Merganser.

Hooded Merganser (female)

Hooded Merganser (female)

This week we encountered a doe and her fawn.

White-tailed deer fawn

White-tailed deer fawn

Thereafter, we stopped in at Bronte Marina.  The Red-necked Grebes have rebuilt their nest and are sitting on a new batch of eggs.  No chicks yet at the second nest but it appears quite precarious.  The Killdeer chick is doing quite well.

Last stop was Lasalle Marina.  The park trail is in dire need of a visit by hawks or the Pied Piper of Chipmunks.  Waaaay too many. There are two Mute Swan families on the water.  This is the younger group.

Mute Swan feeding cygnet

Mute Swan feeding cygnet

Rastro enjoyed the outing.  Having been thoroughly spoiled by all of us, he slept on the ride home.

Today, I returned to Hendrie.  The heat was too much for me until I observed two photographers on the boardwalk.  Picking up the pace, I soon joined them in photographing a doe and her one year old fawn.

female White-tailed Deer observed at Hendrie Valley

female White-tailed Deer observed at Hendrie Valley

female White-tailed Deer

female White-tailed Deer

I had enough energy to snap a few photos of this Hairy Woodpecker.

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

CCIW was definitely cooler.  Here I encountered five photographers enjoying the challenge of photographing the terns and cormorants but probably not the gulls.

partial view of the multitude

partial view of the multitude

Lift every voice and sing

Lift every voice and sing

Caspian Tern choir - there is always one that never joins in

Caspian Tern choir – there is always one that never joins in

Caspian Tern in flight

Caspian Tern in flight

Caspian Tern chick and parent at water's edge

Caspian Tern chick and parent at water’s edge

Caspian Tern chick cools off in the water

Caspian Tern chick cools off in the water

Caspian Tern chick stretching its wings

Caspian Tern chick stretching its wings (This confounded gull almost always photobombed my attempts at capturing the chick on its own.)

Until next time!

Ring-billed Gulls foraging behind ship

Ring-billed Gulls foraging behind ship